Cathleen Kronemer

Cathleen Kronemer is an NFPT CEC writer and a member of the NFPT Certification Council Board. Cathleen is an AFAA-Certified Group Exercise Instructor, NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer, ACE-Certified Health Coach, former competitive bodybuilder and freelance writer. She is employed at the Jewish Community Center in St. Louis, MO. Cathleen has been involved in the fitness industry for over three decades. Feel free to contact her at trainhard@kronemer.com. She welcomes your feedback and your comments!

Seasonal Affective Disorder: How Personal Trainers Can Help Clients See the Light

For those of us who are winter sports enthusiasts, the onset of colder weather signals the beginning of snow-related fun. Yet for others, the shorter days and colder temperatures trigger a cascade of symptoms that are anything but pleasant. Feelings of depression, anxiety, and moodiness are symptoms commonly associated with what scientists have termed Seasonal Affective Disorder, or quite aptly, SAD.

Myostatin: Medical Breakthrough May Lead Athletes Astray

Any serious athlete knows that good results take time: dedication to training, proper nutrition, adequate rest, all of these things are strong contributors to any successful outcome. Some athletes choose to add a variety of natural supplements to their training regimen; yet even with this boost, there is no single “magic pill“ that can instantly transform the physique. Or is there?

Dorsalgia: Back Pain and the Personal Training Client

Personal trainers are bound to address back pain complaints or conditions when working with adult clients. Back problems affect a considerable number of adults each year, ranking as the second most common complaint to physicians. Nearly 16 million adults — 8% — experience persistent or chronic back pain, curtailing many everyday activities. Over 2 million adults suffer permanent pain/disability. As the sixth most expensive medical condition in the United States, direct and indirect back-related healthcare costs can run over $12 billion per year.

Dorsalgia, one of the most common skeletal muscle syndromes, refers to pain in the upper back and includes sciatic pain, but excludes discomfort relating to scoliosis or lordosis. This painful condition often develops with age, particularly affecting those with a variety of comorbid conditions.